SEA STORIES

Page Two 

   


USS QUEENFISH SS393
Old memories, and a little humor.
By Dick Fason and Jack Bennett  
 

Dick Fason EM1(SS) starts the stories.

"I was on her for the first three runs and was glad to have served my country on her we had a great record. I was the auxiliary electrician. Paul Miller Was COB. This is all he ever wrote to his wife; ' Safe but not sound. Well but, not happy'."

"During the war playing cards had, 'Buy more war bonds', on the back . Peter Leon used to go through the boat during depth charge attacks holding one of these cards in his hand for everyone to see. This got a lot of laughs from some of the crew."

"Peter Leon (MoMM1c) must have made (CmoMM) while on the boat. I have a picture of him in a chief's uniform."

"We carried torpedo juice (grain alcohol with an additive) for cleaning parts of the fish (torpedoes) but used very little for that job. One smart crewman made a still out of a brass hand suction pump, copper tubing and a small funnel. It was set up in the motor room so we could use the cooling water for the reduction gears to condense the alcohol. We used a cup to collect it in. The 2 controllermen and I had the duty to go down and dump and refill every hour. There was about 10 gallons purified when we arrived at Pearl Harbor. Some of the guys had a smashing good time drinking it in Royal Hawaiian hotel."

"The Officer's steward ( Jesse Jr. ) I think was his name. He was a minister before he joined the navy and had lots of children. Every time we were being depth charged he would run and get in his bunk in the forward torpedo room and start praying. I used to tell him there's no sense in praying that God can't hear you through all this noise."

"I was responsible for the gyrocompass and cleaned the carbon that formed on the rings every two weeks with pure grain alcohol. The Captain kept a gallon locked in his stateroom for this purpose. Paul Miller being the COB would get half a cup from him when it was time to clean the compass I used a spoon full . We would put Coke syrup in what was left over and drink it. I don't think anyone knew that."

"When we were distilling the torpedo juice you could smell it through out the boat. The Engineering Officer would stop me and says ' Fason do you smell that odor?' I said, no sir I don't smell anything."

"At our first rest camp, Majuro Island, they used to say 'if you slept cross wise your feet would be in the water'. Eddie Peabody and two other gentlemen entertained us with banjoes one day there. I think Eddie was a famous banjo player."

"The Queenfish ( SS393 ), her Officers and crew, did a great job to help win the war and brought me home safe and sound. I thank you many times over."

Richard "Dick" Fason
 


"Jack" Bennett (XO and "Plankowner") continues the story, and adds some of his own.

"Dick Fason's memories deserve some added clarification. Eddie Peabody was Probably the greatest banjo player who ever lived and I went backstage to see him when he guest starred at Mickey Finn's Saloon in San Diego around 1965. He sat on a short stool and his fingers ran wild. He always got a standing ovation. But few people know that he was once a QM striker on an S or R boat and survived her sinking in the Caribbean about 1940. Just those on the bridge were rescued. Eddie told me that at Camp Dealey, on Guam after our 3rd run."

"No USO troupe made it to the forward areas - they concentrated on stateside Army camps where they competed with the readily available local shows.'

The doughnut Girls

"Right after the war ended, 5 Red Cross gals arrived in Subic Bay and were taken over by a RADM who'd come up from Fremantle with the tender Eurayle, towing a pontoon of Emu Bitter Ale. "Popeye" Lynn, XO of (USS) PLAICE, and I finished off the last of it in the skippers' bar while they were in Manila one day. Unfortunately the skippers returned early and Charlie and I didn't have a chance to escape."

"Of course the CO's, being hot and tired, went straight to the bar and ordered Emu Bitter Ale, but, the barkeep, Chief Davega, told them it was all gone. Pointing to Popeye and myself, who had so far gone unnoticed at a table in the corner, exclaimed 'They drink it all up!' Of course we weren't even supposed to be in there, let alone drink all the skippers' prized beer."

"Back to the RADM and the donut ladies. He had a Quonset hut erected at the top on a small mountain near Subic and tried to lure one girl at a time up there but they always traveled in a pack and the one worthwhile target was protected by 4 Brunhildes.

The Splash

"I recall one night as I drove a jeep back down the winding mountain road, on the two outer wheels naturally, suddenly a wheel from the jeep behind me came rolling into my headlights and off the cliff. We abandoned the broken jeep on the mountain and all piled into mine, including a 'sleeper' from the PLAICE."

"I offloaded all but my pal Ed 'Desperate' Desmond, who'd made 5 runs as our Asst. Engineer. We then planned to quietly drive the jeep, which we'd 'borrowed' from the Division Engineer, down to the end of the dock where Ed and I would get out and gently push it into the bay. After all, everything was soon surplus and bulldozed off cliffs in Guam, and into canyons, and however they could keep it out of the hands of the natives. Why? - dun't esk. Well, I misjudged the speed and distance and we drove at a pretty good clip off the end of the pier with a loud splash that woke up the echoes. We had to swim underwater around the inboard boat until we could climb out, and into the PLAICE for coffee. Popeye somehow knew without asking what that splash was all about and wished he'd been along. "

" So you see, troops, officers also had a good time when the shooting stopped and we could relax sorta privately."

 Dijon  Brandy & Beer

" Want another? Here it comes anyway. We carried cases of 2 oz Dijon Brandy bottles as depth charge rations and doled them out one per man when the Captain approved it after a particularly harrowing depth charging. Unfortunately some of these little bottles leaked and part of the brandy would evaporate. So people started pulling them out and inspecting until they got a full one. This was unfair to the late pickers, so I ruled that once you touch it, it's yours and you had just the one chance. You wouldn't believe the scrutiny everyone gave the tops of these stupid little bottles trying to figure out how much had evaporated."

"We loaded the officers' shower with cases of beer for the beer/ball game at our next refit, always assuming we'd make it there."

"Nowhere but in the boats are shipmates, both officer and enlisted, so close to each other as in a blood family. We have something very special not shared by the rest of the Navy - or civilized world for that matter."

"Cheers and following winds, fellows, - Jack"

 
 

SSN 651 Nonsense

From Bruce Mundy ET1(SS), (9/68 - 10/69):

"The thing I remember most about our Queenfish experience was when the COB told you to shave your mustache after returning from our long run. You acted dumb and said, "shave what?" COB said, "shave that" and pointed toward your face. You pointed to one side of your mustache and said, "shave this?" COB says, "yes". Next day, of course, you've got half a mustache on your upper lip. When the COB saw that, I thought he was gonna s--t!  I've told this story countless times when telling folks what it was like to be a submariner."

From "Uffie" IC1(SS) (67-72):

It was my first attempt at a mustache, I wasn't gonna give it up without a struggle.

The Turnaround

I remember one time we were in port, and holding a bull session in the torpedo room. Somehow the topic came up that TM3, "Fang" Lassiter could crawl into a torpedo tube, go to the other end and turn around, then crawl out head first. (Lassiter was very skinny.) To everyone's surprise FT2, "Ish" Ishihara said he could do it. Now "Ish" was of slight build, but we thought "Fang" had the edge.

Well the bets were on. "Fang" crawled into the tube, and shortly came back out feet first, "Ish" entered the tube, and after a short delay emerged head first. He had turned around in a 21" diameter torpedo tube.

 

THE SPM STORY

During yard outage for major maintenance in 1969 Queenfish was in dry dock. As you know most boat sailors like to have fun with junior officers. We had to rig the SPM (Secondary Propulsion Motor*) out for major overhaul work on the motor. The space in AMR 2 was wide open during this period. As usual during outage we got some new crew, one being a very junior supply officer who had never been on subs before this assignment. He was assigned the task of finding locations for new supply lockers. While touring engineering spaces he spotted this large space in lower level AMR 2 because SPM had been lowered to permit maintenance on motor. He got ship yard personnel to design locker for wide open space. Before yard was ready to install locker, work on SPM was completed and it was rigged in to storage location. The crew forgot to tell supply officer about SPM and gave the yard workers a few pounds of coffee to forget to tell officer. Officer spent considerable time in lower AMR 2, the day yard came to install locker the space could not be located and the very junior Supply Officer was sure a space was there !!After he spent some time learning to talk to crew before jumping into some thing he knew nothing about, we informed him about SPM. We even provided space for new locker in frame bay in upper engine room . Ah to be a junior officer on a boat was true learning experience !!

*For those not familiar with the SPM. It was located just aft of the reactor compartment in lower level AMS 2 (Auxiliary Machinery Room 2 for us.) It is electric and could be lowered from the bottom of the boat, think inboard-outboard motor, and can be used to slowly propel and maneuver the boat. It was most useful in docking operations where there was no tug available.

The junior officer went on to not only qualify for supply officer dolphins, but he was the first supply officer to qualify on watch stations (non-nuke) and to be a fully qualified submarine officer.

 
 

[ Email Me | Home | Ship's Rosters | Sub Library | | Yeoman | SS 393 | SSN 651 ]
 [ Submarine News | Slang | About | Reunion | Photos | Links ]
[ Guest book | Stories | Searches | Help Us | Uffie | Chat ]